Sherlock Holmes: “The Hound of the Baskervilles” (1-2)

So maybe the title shouldn’t be in quotes, since it’s sort of a novel instead of a short story? I think I will stick with the quotes.

Summary: In the first two chapters we are set up with the problem. First, a guy has come by the house and left his walking stick behind. Sherlock has Watson make his own assumptions about the man based on the stick, which results in Sherlock complementing him on his work followed by “but, you’re wrong.” That made me laugh out loud a little. Then the man showed up and they questioned him to see what they got right–and even Sherlock had not gotten everything right.

Anyway, this guy had come in from the country and he shared a legend about a crazy guy, Baskerville, who wanted to rape some chick, but she got away, and he chased her down, but this giant black dog chased him, and they all died, and from then on all the Baskervilles were cursed and died at early ages under mysterious circumstances.

And though Sherlock doesn’t believe in the “fairy tale,” as he puts it, he is intrigued by the latest Baskerville death, and agrees to go investigate.

Sherlock Rating: Since in writing, each scene/chapter/section has to have its own mini-plot with rise and fall, I will rate each chapter. But I will give them paw-prints instead and reserve magnifying glasses for the complete story. (So five paw-prints is not held to the same standard as five magnifying glasses).

I give chapter 1 “Mr. Sherlock Holmes” 4.5 paw-prints, for its humor and classic Sherlock-ness. It was almost 5, but I want to reserve the highest rating for something with more action/drama.

Chapter 2: “The Curse of the Baskervilles” gets 3 paw-prints. The story was interesting, but not much else happened, so not bad–just average.

Mystery Story Convention: The client who comes to the detective’s doorstep asking for help and giving an unbelievable story to get the detective’s attention. It would have been even better had the man been a damsel in distress.

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